Storm Glass – How They Work

Storm Glass – How They Work

Have you ever seen a storm glass? Maybe you know it better as a weather predictor. I first discovered these wonderful little contraptions about a year or two ago and instantly fell in love with it. Not only was it pretty to look at it was absolutely fascinating watching the follicles in the device changing every day.

A storm glass or weather predictor is a sealed glass bottle with chemicals inside that react with the weather (more light and temperature) outside or in a room (From personal experience the weather predictor works much better if placed on a windowsill, or near the window on a side table or something, but not to place it in direct sunlight!) As long as the ornament has access to natural lighting and a bit of natural temperature too, it should work just fine. You’re going to have completely different results if you’ve placed your storm glass by a radiator and wondering why it’s predicting sunshine or somewhat when it’s actually snowing outside, do you know what I mean?

Storm glasses do not predict the weather for that day though, they’re known for predicting the weather 1-3 days later. Today these funky little objects are more known to measure temperature as apposed to pressure that they once, back in the 1700’s used to be more known for.

Here’s a guide on how to read a storm glass from wxobservation.com

How to Read a Storm Glass

Storm Glass Observation Weather Prediction
Cloudy liquid with small spots Storms
Clear liquid Bright & sunny
Small spots in winter months Sunny, but snow coming
Large flakes Overcast sky, snow in winter months
Flakes toward the top of the glass Winds in the atmosphere, weather change coming
Cloudy liquid Either raining or rain coming soon
Strands at top of the glass Windy
Small spots suspended in the liquid Foggy
Crystals at bottom of the glass Frost

If you want to purchase your own storm glass, then you’re just in luck! Check it out in my store now!

storm glass

 

(Visited 30 times, 1 visits today)


6 thoughts on “Storm Glass – How They Work”

Leave a Reply